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vice

noun

  1. (evilness)  moral weakness
    Synonyms: frailty. Type of: evilness
  2. (transgression)  a specific form of evildoing
    Type of: transgression
  3. (holding device)  a holding device attached to a workbench; has 2 jaws to hold workpiece firmly in place
    Synonyms: bench vice [British spelling], bench vise [American/Canadian spelling], vise...

Etymology summary

via Old French from Latin vitium a defect | from Old French vis a screw, from...
(Source: Collins Dictionary)  [more]

Definition references  (+images)

Wikipedia:

Vice

a practice or a behavior or habit generally considered immoral, depraved, or degrading in the associated society. In more minor usage, vice can refer to a fault, a negative character trait, a defect, an infirmity, or a bad or unhealthy habit. Synonyms... (42 of 1957 words, 1 image)

en​.wikipedia​.org​/wiki​/Vice

Vice (disambiguation)

the opposite of virtue. Vice may also refer to: vice, a Latin word meaning "in place of" | Vice (character), a common character representing evil in medieval morality plays | Vice squeeze or The Vice, a squeeze play in contract bridge, the card game | ... (42 of 305 words, 29 definitions)

en​.wikipedia​.org​/wiki​/Vice (disambiguation)

Merriam-Webster:

vise [entry 1, noun] | viselike [adjective, related]

any of various tools with two jaws for holding work that close usually by a screw, lever, or cam | something likened to a vise (24 of 79 words, 2 definitions, 1 usage example, pronunciations, 1 image)

www​.merriam-webster​.com​/dictionary​/vise

vice [entry 1, noun] | Vice [sense-specific] | foible [synonym, sense-specific] | blemish [synonym, sense-specific] | wickedness [synonym, sense-specific] | defect [synonym, sense-specific] | buffoon [synonym, sense-specific] | especially [synonym, sense-specific] | jester [synonym, sense-specific] | ...

moral depravity or corruption; "wickedness" ; a moral fault or failing ; a habitual and usually trivial defect or shortcoming; "foible" | "blemish", ... (22 of 256 words, 6 definitions, 1 usage example, pronunciation)

www​.merriam-webster​.com​/dictionary​/vice

vice [entry 3, preposition]

in the place of ; also, rather than (8 of 38 words, 1 usage example, pronunciation)

www​.merriam-webster​.com​/dictionary​/vice show=2

Collins Dictionary:

vice | vise [often US] | Vice [often US] | viceless [adjective, derived] | vicelike [adjective, derived]

an immoral, wicked, or evil habit, action, or trait | habitual or frequent indulgence in pernicious, immoral, or degrading practices | a specific form ... (22 of 638 words, 13 definitions, 11 usage examples, pronunciations)

www​.collinsdictionary​.com​/dictionary​/english​/vice

Random House Dictionary:

vice | viced [past tense] | vicing [present participle] | vice- | Vice [sense-specific] | vise [synonym, sense-specific]

an immoral or evil habit or practice. | immoral conduct; depraved or degrading behavior. | sexual immorality, especially prostitution. | a particular ... (19 of 140 words, 11 definitions, 4 usage examples, pronunciations)

dictionary​.infoplease​.com​/vice

New World Dictionary:

vice

an evil or wicked action, habit, or characteristic ; evil or wicked conduct ... | any trivial fault or failing, act of self-indulgence, etc. | a ... (24 of 124 words, 7 definitions, pronunciations)

www​.yourdictionary​.com​/vice

Oxford Dictionary:

vice [entry 1] | stable vice | viceless [derived]

immoral or wicked behaviour | criminal activities involving prostitution, pornography, or drugs | an immoral or wicked personal characteristic | a ... (18 of 120 words, 5 definitions, 4 usage examples, pronunciation)

oxforddictionaries​.com​/definition​/english​/vice

vice [entry 2]

as a substitute for (4 of 65 words, 1 usage example, pronunciation)

oxforddictionaries​.com​/definition​/english​/vice--2

vice [entry 3] | vise [United States] | vice-like [derived]

a metal tool with movable jaws which are used to hold an object firmly in place while work is done on it, typically attached to a workbench (27 of 86 words, 2 usage examples, pronunciation)

oxforddictionaries​.com​/definition​/english​/vice--3

vice [entry 4]

Entry from World dictionary | [informal] | short for "vice president", "vice admiral", etc. (12 of 40 words, 3 definitions, pronunciation)

oxforddictionaries​.com​/definition​/american english​/vice--4

vice [entry 4, informal]

short for "vice president", "vice admiral", etc (7 of 35 words, pronunciation)

oxforddictionaries​.com​/definition​/english​/vice--4

American Heritage Dictionary:

vice | Vice [sense-specific]

An evil, degrading, or immoral practice or habit. | A serious moral failing. | Wicked or evil conduct or habits; corruption. | Sexual immorality, ... (21 of 107 words, 12 definitions, 1 usage example, pronunciations)

www​.yourdictionary​.com​/vice

Macmillan British Dictionary:

vice | vices [plural] | vise [American spelling]

[countable] a bad habit or personal quality | [uncountable, formal] extremely bad and immoral behaviour ; [uncountable] crimes relating to sex, for ... (21 of 70 words, 3 definitions, 1 usage example, pronunciation)

www​.macmillandictionary​.com​/dictionary​/british​/vice

Cambridge Dictionary:

vice [entry 1] | vice-

used as part of the title of particular positions. The person who holds one of these positions is next below in authority to the person who holds the ... (28 of 48 words, 2 usage examples, pronunciation)

dictionary​.cambridge​.org​/dictionary​/british​/vice 1

vice [entry 2]

(a) moral fault or weakness in someone's character | illegal and immoral activities, especially involving illegal sex, drugs, etc. (18 of 66 words, 2 definitions, 3 usage examples, pronunciation)

dictionary​.cambridge​.org​/dictionary​/british​/vice 2

vice [entry 3] | vise

([United States] "vise") [British] a tool with two parts which can be moved together by tightening a screw so that an object can be held firmly ... (26 of 65 words, 2 usage examples, pronunciation)

dictionary​.cambridge​.org​/dictionary​/british​/vice 3

Wiktionary:

vice | vices [plural] | vise [United States, sense-specific] | virtue [antonym, sense-specific]

A bad habit. | [law] Any of various crimes related (depending on jurisdiction) to prostitution, pornography, gambling, alcohol, or drugs. | A mechanical screw apparatus used for clamping or holding (also spelled vise). | in place of; subordinate to; ... (36 of 61 words, 5 definitions, 4 usage examples, pronunciations)

en​.wiktionary​.org​/wiki​/vice

Encarta Dictionary:

vise | vises [plural] | vised [past tense] | vising [present participle] | vice [mechanical engineering, British]

a tool with two jaws that can be closed by a lever or screw, used to hold an object immobile so that it can be worked on | to hold something tightly ... (31 of 80 words, 2 definitions, pronunciation)

encarta​.msn​.com​/dictionary 1861734330​/definition​.html  [offline]

vice [entry 1] | vices [plural]

an immoral or wicked habit or characteristic | immoral conduct | criminal activity connected with prostitution and other sexual offenses, gambling, ... (19 of 93 words, 5 definitions, pronunciation)

encarta​.msn​.com​/dictionary 1861732145​/definition​.html  [offline]

vice [entry 2]

in place of or instead of somebody or something (9 of 34 words, pronunciation)

encarta​.msn​.com​/dictionary 1861734045​/definition​.html  [offline]

Etymology references

Collins Dictionary:

vice | vise [often US] | Vice [often US]

First use: 13th century | 15th century | 18th century | 16th century

Origin: via Old French from Latin vitium a defect | from Old French vis a screw, from Latin vītis vine, plant with spiralling tendrils ... (30 of 46 etymology words)

www​.collinsdictionary​.com​/dictionary​/english​/vice

Wiktionary:

vice | vices [plural]

Origin: Anglo-Norman from Old French from Latin vitium ("fault or blemish"). | French vis ("screw, winding stairs"), from Old French vis, viz, from Latin vitis ("vine"); akin to English withy. | Latin vice... (30 of 37 etymology words)

en​.wiktionary​.org​/wiki​/vice

New World Dictionary:

vice

Origin: Middle English from Old French from Latin vitium, vice, fault from ... | Latin: see "vice-" (15 of 27 etymology words)

www​.yourdictionary​.com​/vice

American Heritage Dictionary:

vice

Origin: Middle English, from Old French, from Latin vitium. | Latin ablative of *vix, change; see "vice-".

www​.yourdictionary​.com​/vice

Merriam-Webster:

vice [entry 1, noun] | Vice [sense-specific]

First use: 14th century

Origin: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin vitium fault, vice

www​.merriam-webster​.com​/dictionary​/vice

vice [entry 3, preposition]

First use: 1770

Origin: Latin, ablative of vicis change, alternation, stead

www​.merriam-webster​.com​/dictionary​/vice show=2

Oxford Dictionary:

vice [entry 1] | stable vice

Origin: Middle English: via Old French from Latin vitium

oxforddictionaries​.com​/definition​/english​/vice

vice [entry 2]

Origin: Latin, ablative of vic- "change"

oxforddictionaries​.com​/definition​/english​/vice--2

vice [entry 3] | vise [United States]

Origin: Middle English (denoting a screw or winch): from Old French vis, from Latin vitis "vine"

oxforddictionaries​.com​/definition​/english​/vice--3

Encarta Dictionary:

vice [entry 1] | vices [plural]

First use: 13th century

Origin: French from Latin vitium

encarta​.msn​.com​/dictionary 1861732145​/definition​.html  [offline]

vice [entry 2]

First use: Late 18th century

Origin: Latin vice "in place of" from vic- "change, place"

encarta​.msn​.com​/dictionary 1861734045​/definition​.html  [offline]

Audio references

Wiktionary:

vice | vices [plural]

Audio: North American English pronunciation of "vice"

en​.wiktionary​.org​/wiki​/vice

Collins Dictionary:

vice | vise [often US] | Vice [often US]

Audio 1: British English pronunciation of "vice"

Audio 2: British English pronunciation of "vice"

Audio 3: North American English pronunciation of "Vice"

www​.collinsdictionary​.com​/dictionary​/english​/vice

Macmillan British Dictionary:

vice | vices [plural]

Audio: British English pronunciation of "vice"

www​.macmillandictionary​.com​/dictionary​/british​/vice

Cambridge Dictionary:

vice [entry 2]

Audio 1: British English pronunuciation of "vice"

Audio 2: North American English pronunuciation of "vice"

dictionary​.cambridge​.org​/dictionary​/british​/vice 2

vice [entry 1]

Audio: British English pronunuciation of "vice"

dictionary​.cambridge​.org​/dictionary​/british​/vice 1

Macmillan American Dictionary:

vice | vices [plural]

Audio: North American pronunciation of "vice"

www​.macmillandictionary​.com​/dictionary​/american​/vice

the Free Dictionary:

vice

Audio 1: North American English pronunciation of "vice"

Audio 2: British English pronunciation of "vice"

Audio 3: North American English pronunciation of "vice" by speech synthesizer

Audio 4: North American English pronunciation of "vice" by speech synthesizer

www​.thefreedictionary​.com​/vice

Google Dictionary:

vice | vices [plural]

Audio: English pronunciation of "vice"

www​.google​.com​/#hl=en&tbs=dfn​:1&fp=1&q=vice

Merriam-Webster Pronunciation:

vice

Audio: North American pronunciation of "vice"

www​.merriam-webster​.com​/audio​.php file=vice​0001 word=vice

vice

Audio: North American pronunciation of "vice"

www​.merriam-webster​.com​/audio​.php file=vice​0003 word=vice

vice

Audio: North American pronunciation of "vice"

www​.merriam-webster​.com​/audio​.php file=vice​0002 word=vice

YourDictionary Audio:

vice

Audio: North American English pronunciation of "vice" by speech synthesizer

www​.yourdictionary​.com​/vice

freedictionary.org:

Vice

Audio: North American English pronunciation of "Vice" by speech synthesizer

freedictionary​.org​/ Query=vice

Page last updated: 2013-06-26

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