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subject (message)

Definition:

the subject matter of a conversation or discussion

Class:

communication noun (communicative processes and contents)

Plural:

subjects

Original source:

Princeton WordNet

Usage example:

he didn't want to discuss that subject

Synonyms:

theme | topic | subj. [abbreviation]

Etymology:

[noun] "person under control or dominion of another", from Old French ... | ...
(Source: Online Etymology)  [more]

All senses of subject...

Definition references

Collins Dictionary:

topic

a subject or theme of a speech, essay, book, etc | a subject of conversation; item of discussion | (in rhetoric, logic, etc) a category or class of ... (26 of 448 words, 3 definitions, 9 usage examples, pronunciation)

www​.collinsdictionary​.com​/dictionary​/english​/topic

Wikipedia:

Topic [disambiguation] | Topicality

may refer to: Topic (linguistics), what is being talked about | Topic (chocolate bar), a brand of confectionery bar | Topics (Aristotle), a work by Aristotle | Topical, a medication applied to body surfaces | Topical song, a type of song that serves to... (40 of 180 words, 13 definitions)

en​.wikipedia​.org​/wiki​/Topic

Merriam-Webster:

topic | argument [synonym, sense-specific] | reason [synonym, sense-specific] | content [synonym, sense-specific] | motif [synonym, sense-specific] | motive [synonym, sense-specific] | question [synonym, sense-specific] | subject [synonym, sense-specific] | theme [synonym, sense-specific] | ...

one of the general forms of argument employed in probable reasoning ; "argument", "reason" | a heading in an outlined argument or exposition ; the ... (24 of 170 words, 2 definitions, pronunciation)

www​.merriam-webster​.com​/dictionary​/topic

Oxford Dictionary:

topic

a matter dealt with in a text, discourse, or conversation; a subject | [linguistics] : that part of a sentence about which something is said, ... (24 of 99 words, 2 definitions, 1 usage example, pronunciation)

oxforddictionaries​.com​/definition​/english​/topic

American Heritage Dictionary:

topic | theme [sense-specific]

The subject of a speech, essay, thesis, or discourse. | A subject of discussion or conversation. | A subdivision of a theme, thesis, or outline. | ... (23 of 92 words, 4 definitions, pronunciation)

www​.yourdictionary​.com​/topic

Random House Dictionary:

topic | theme [synonym, sense-specific]

a subject of conversation or discussion. | the subject or theme of a discourse or of one of its parts. | [rhetoric, logic] a general field of ... (25 of 85 words, 4 definitions, 1 usage example, pronunciation)

dictionary​.infoplease​.com​/topic

New World Dictionary:

topic

[historical] ; a class or category of considerations or arguments on which a rhetorician may draw ; one such consideration or argument | the subject ... (24 of 77 words, 4 definitions, pronunciation)

www​.yourdictionary​.com​/topic

Macmillan British Dictionary:

topic [countable] | topics [plural]

a subject that you write or speak about (8 of 60 words, 3 usage examples, pronunciation)

www​.macmillandictionary​.com​/dictionary​/british​/topic

Cambridge Dictionary:

topic

a subject which is discussed, written about or studied (9 of 30 words, 1 usage example, pronunciations)

dictionary​.cambridge​.org​/dictionary​/british​/topic

Wiktionary:

topic | topics [plural] | topick [obsolete, sense-specific] | subject [synonym, sense-specific] | topical [synonym, sense-specific] | theme [synonym, sense-specific] | Subject [synonym, sense-specific]

topical | Subject; theme; a category or general area of interest. | [internet] discussion thread (13 of 18 words, 3 definitions)

en​.wiktionary​.org​/wiki​/topic

Britannica Encyclopedia:

theme [Byzantine government] | Thema [Greek]

in the Byzantine Empire, originally, a military unit stationed in a provincial area; in the 7th century the name was applied to large military ... (24 of 205 words)

www​.britannica​.com​/E​Bchecked​/topic​/590490​/theme

Columbia Encyclopedia:

substance

in philosophy, term used to denote the changeless substratum presumed in some philosophies to be present in all being. Aristotle defined substance as ... (23 of 162 words)

www​.infoplease​.com​/ce​6​/society​/A​0847072​.html

Encarta Dictionary:

topic | topics [plural]

something dealt with in a text or in discussion | a class of arguments used as a source of proofs in formal reasoning (22 of 59 words, 2 definitions, pronunciation)

encarta​.msn​.com​/dictionary 1861720919​/definition​.html  [offline]

Etymology references

Online Etymology:

subject

First use: early 14th century | late 14th century

Origin: [noun] "person under control or dominion of another", from Old French ... | [verb] "to make (a person or nation) subject to another by force", also ... (31 of 199 etymology words)

www​.etymonline​.com​/index​.php term=subject

Oxford Dictionary:

subject | subject to | subject someone/thing to

Origin: Middle English (in the sense "(person) owing obedience"): from Old French suget, from Latin subjectus "brought under", past participle ... (19 of 55 etymology words)

oxforddictionaries​.com​/definition​/english​/subject

New World Dictionary:

subject

Origin: Middle English suget from Old French from Latin subjectus, ... | Latin subjectum, foundation, subject (translation of Greek to ... (18 of 53 etymology words)

www​.yourdictionary​.com​/subject

Wiktionary:

subject | subjects [plural] | subjected [past tense] | subjecting [present participle]

Origin: Middle English subget, from Old French suget, from Latin subiectus ("lying under or near, adjacent, also subject, exposed"), as a noun, subiectus ("a subject, an inferior"), subiectum ("the subject of a... (31 of 49 etymology words)

en​.wiktionary​.org​/wiki​/subject

American Heritage Dictionary:

subject | subjected [past tense] | subjecting [present participle] | subjects [3rd-person singular present]

Origin: Middle English, from Old French, from Latin sūbiectus, from past participle of sūbicere, to subject: sub-, sub- + ... (18 of 25 etymology words)

www​.yourdictionary​.com​/subject

Collins Dictionary:

subject

First use: 14th century

Origin: from Latin subjectus brought under, from subicere to place under, from sub- + jacere to throw

www​.collinsdictionary​.com​/dictionary​/english​/subjects

Merriam-Webster:

subject [entry 1, noun]

First use: 14th century

Origin: Middle English suget, subget, from Anglo-French, from Latin subjectus one under authority and subjectum subject of a ... (19 of 42 etymology words)

www​.merriam-webster​.com​/dictionary​/subject

Encarta Dictionary:

subject | subjects [plural] | subjected [past tense] | subjecting [present participle]

First use: 14th century

Origin: French from Latin subjectus from subicere "place under" from jacere "lie"

encarta​.msn​.com​/dictionary 1861716468​/definition​.html  [offline]

Audio references

Macmillan British Dictionary:

subject [countable] | subjects [plural]

Audio: British English pronunciation of "subject"

www​.macmillandictionary​.com​/dictionary​/british​/subject

subject [only before noun, formal, adjective]

Audio: British English pronunciation of "subject"

www​.macmillandictionary​.com​/dictionary​/british​/subject 24

subject [transitive, verb] | subjected [past tense] | subjected to [past tense] | subjecting [present participle] | subjecting to [present participle] | subjects [3rd-person singular present] | subjects to [3rd-person singular present]

Audio: British English pronunciation of "subject"

www​.macmillandictionary​.com​/dictionary​/british​/subject 20

Macmillan American Dictionary:

subject [countable] | subjects [plural]

Audio: North American pronunciation of "subject"

www​.macmillandictionary​.com​/dictionary​/american​/subject

subject [only before noun, formal, adjective]

Audio: North American pronunciation of "subject"

www​.macmillandictionary​.com​/dictionary​/american​/subject 24

subject [transitive, verb] | subjected [past tense] | subjected to [past tense] | subjecting [present participle] | subjecting to [present participle] | subjects [3rd-person singular present] | subjects to [3rd-person singular present]

Audio: North American pronunciation of "subject"

www​.macmillandictionary​.com​/dictionary​/american​/subject 20

Cambridge Dictionary:

subject [entry 1]

Audio 1: British English pronunuciation of "subject"

Audio 2: North American English pronunuciation of "subject"

dictionary​.cambridge​.org​/dictionary​/british​/subject 1

subject [entry 4]

Audio 1: British English pronunuciation of "subject"

Audio 2: North American English pronunuciation of "subject"

dictionary​.cambridge​.org​/dictionary​/british​/subject 4

the Free Dictionary:

subject

Audio 1: North American English pronunciation of "subject"

Audio 2: British English pronunciation of "subject"

Audio 3: North American English pronunciation of "subject" by speech synthesizer

www​.thefreedictionary​.com​/subject

Google Dictionary:

subject | subjects [plural]

Audio 1: English pronunciation of "subject"

Audio 2: English pronunciation of "subject"

www​.google​.com​/#hl=en&tbs=dfn​:1&fp=1&q=subject

Merriam-Webster Pronunciation:

subject

Audio: North American pronunciation of "subject"

www​.merriam-webster​.com​/audio​.php file=subjec​01 word=subject

subject

Audio: North American pronunciation of "subject"

www​.merriam-webster​.com​/audio​.php file=subjec​03 word=subject

YourDictionary Audio:

subject

Audio: North American English pronunciation of "subject" by speech synthesizer

www​.yourdictionary​.com​/subject

Page last updated: 2013-06-26

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