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full term (point in time)

Definition:

the end of gestation or point at which birth is imminent

Class:

time noun (time and temporal relations)

Plural:

full terms

Original source:

Princeton WordNet

Usage example:

a healthy baby born at full term

Synonyms:

term

Etymology:

terme "limit in time, set or appointed period", from Old French terme "limit of...
(Source: Online Etymology)  [more]

All senses of full term...

Definition references  (+images)

Wikipedia:

Pregnancy

the fertilization and development of one or more offspring, known as an embryo or fetus, in a woman's uterus. In a pregnancy, there can be multiple gestations, as in the case of twins or triplets. Childbirth usually occurs about 38 weeks after... (42 of 12157 words, 23 images)

en​.wikipedia​.org​/wiki​/Pregnancy

Collins Dictionary:

full term

the end of a pregnancy that lasted the full nine months to come to full ... | in a way which is of or relating to a pregnancy that lasted the full ... (31 of 530 words, 2 definitions, 9 usage examples, pronunciation)

www​.collinsdictionary​.com​/dictionary​/english​/full-term

Oxford Dictionary:

full term

see "term" [sense-specific of the noun]. | (at Oxford and Cambridge) the main part of the university term, during which lectures are given. (22 of 43 words, 2 definitions)

oxforddictionaries​.com​/definition​/english​/full-term

Wiktionary:

full term

In regards to pregnancy, refers to a woman carrying a baby for the full nine months of gestation. (18 of 19 words)

en​.wiktionary​.org​/wiki​/full term

Britannica Encyclopedia:

term [architecture and sculpture]

in the visual arts, element consisting of a sculptured figure or bust at the top of a stone pillar or column that usually tapers downward to a ... (27 of 192 words, 1 image)

www​.britannica​.com​/E​Bchecked​/topic​/587931​/term

term [logic]

in logic, the subject or predicate of a categorical proposition, or statement. Aristotle so used the Greek word horos, apparently by an analogy ... (23 of 209 words)

www​.britannica​.com​/E​Bchecked​/topic​/587934​/term

Macmillan British Dictionary:

term | terms [plural] | come to terms with someone | come to terms with something | in someone's terms | on equal/the same terms | be on good/bad/friendly etc terms | on speaking terms | on your own terms

[countable] a word or phrase used for referring to something ; [countable, often plural] a word or phrase used as a name or for describing someone | ... (26 of 667 words, 16 definitions, 37 usage examples, pronunciation)

www​.macmillandictionary​.com​/dictionary​/british​/term

term [transitive, often passive, verb] | termed [past tense] | terming [present participle] | terms [3rd-person singular present]

to use a particular word or phrase to describe or refer to someone or something (15 of 65 words, 2 usage examples, pronunciation)

www​.macmillandictionary​.com​/dictionary​/british​/term 49

Merriam-Webster:

term [entry 1, noun] | in terms of | on one's own terms | terms [plural] | duration [synonym, sense-specific] | conditions [synonym, sense-specific] | end [synonym, sense-specific] | footing [synonym, sense-specific] | concord [synonym, sense-specific] | ...

"end", "termination" ; also, a point in time assigned to something (as a payment) ; the time at which a pregnancy of normal length terminates | a ... (26 of 488 words, 11 definitions, 12 usage examples, pronunciation)

www​.merriam-webster​.com​/dictionary​/term

term [entry 2, verb] | call [synonym] | name [synonym] | baptize [synonym] | christen [synonym] | clepe [archaic, synonym] | denominate [archaic, synonym] | designate [archaic, synonym] | dub [archaic, synonym] | ...

to apply a term to; "call", "name" (7 of 74 words)

www​.merriam-webster​.com​/dictionary​/term show=1

Random House Dictionary:

term | term. | terms [sense-specific] | bring to terms [sense-specific] | come to terms [sense-specific] | eat one's terms [sense-specific] | in terms of [sense-specific] | terminus [synonym, sense-specific] | term.: terminal [synonym, sense-specific] | ...

a word or group of words designating something, especially in a particular ... | any word or group of words considered as a member of a construction ... (26 of 425 words, 20 definitions, 8 usage examples, pronunciation)

dictionary​.infoplease​.com​/term

New World Dictionary:

term

[archaic] a point of time designating the beginning or end of a period | a set date, as for payment, termination of tenancy, etc. | a set period of ... (27 of 305 words, 16 definitions, 5 usage examples, pronunciation)

www​.yourdictionary​.com​/term

American Heritage Dictionary:

term | termed [past tense] | terming [present participle] | terms [3rd-person singular present]

A limited period of time. | A period of time that is assigned to a person to serve | A period when a school or court is in session. | A point in time ... (31 of 288 words, 18 definitions, 7 usage examples, pronunciation)

www​.yourdictionary​.com​/term

Cambridge Dictionary:

term [entry 1] | semester | quarter | in the long/medium/short term | in the long term | in the medium term | in the short term

the fixed period of time which something lasts for | [British] ([United States] "semester":, "quarter") one of the periods into which a year is ... (23 of 177 words, 5 definitions, 8 usage examples, pronunciations)

dictionary​.cambridge​.org​/dictionary​/british​/term 1

term [entry 2] | term of abuse | term of endearment | in terms of/in ... terms | in terms of ... terms | in terms in ... terms | in no uncertain terms | in strong, etc. terms

a word or expression used in relation to a particular subject, often to describe something official or technical | "term of abuse": an unkind or ... (24 of 146 words, 6 definitions, 6 usage examples, pronunciations)

dictionary​.cambridge​.org​/dictionary​/british​/term 2

term [entry 3] | terms | on easy terms | on equal terms | on the same terms | terms of reference

"terms": [plural] the conditions which control an agreement, arrangement or activity | "on easy terms": If you buy something on easy terms, you pay ... (23 of 90 words, 4 definitions, 3 usage examples, pronunciations)

dictionary​.cambridge​.org​/dictionary​/british​/term 3

term [entry 4]

to give something a name or to describe it with a particular expression (13 of 33 words, 1 usage example, pronunciations)

dictionary​.cambridge​.org​/dictionary​/british​/term 4

Encarta Dictionary:

term | terms [plural] | termed [past tense] | terming [present participle]

a word or combination of words, especially one used to mean something very specific or one used in a specialized area of knowledge or work | the ... (26 of 516 words, 15 definitions, pronunciation)

encarta​.msn​.com​/dictionary 1861719147​/definition​.html  [offline]

Etymology references

Online Etymology:

term

First use: early 13th century

Origin: terme "limit in time, set or appointed period", from Old French terme "limit of time or place" (11th century), from Latin ... (24 of 122 etymology words)

www​.etymonline​.com​/index​.php term=term

New World Dictionary:

term

Origin: Middle English terme from Old French from Latin terminus, a limit, boundary, end from Indo-European *termṇ, a boundary stake from ... (20 of 32 etymology words)

www​.yourdictionary​.com​/term

American Heritage Dictionary:

term | termed [past tense] | terming [present participle] | terms [3rd-person singular present]

Origin: Middle English terme, from Old French, from Latin terminus, boundary. N., senses 4-8, from Middle English, from Medieval Latin ... (19 of 31 etymology words)

www​.yourdictionary​.com​/term

Oxford Dictionary:

term | term day | full term | term of years [British] | term for years [United States] | in ---- terms [United States] | terms [United States]

Origin: Middle English (denoting a limit in space or time, or (in the plural) limiting conditions): from Old French terme, from Latin terminus ... (22 of 25 etymology words)

oxforddictionaries​.com​/definition​/english​/term

Wiktionary:

term | terms [plural] | termed [past tense] | terming [present participle]

Origin: Middle English terme, from Old French terme, from Latin terminus ("a bound, boundary, limit, end, in Medieval Latin also a time, period, word, covenant, etc.").

en​.wiktionary​.org​/wiki​/term

Collins Dictionary:

term

First use: 13th century

Origin: from Old French terme, from Latin terminus end

www​.collinsdictionary​.com​/dictionary​/english​/term

Merriam-Webster:

term [entry 1, noun]

First use: 13th century

Origin: Middle English terme, from Anglo-French, from Latin terminus boundary marker, limit; akin to Greek termōn boundary, end, Sanskrit tarman top of a post

www​.merriam-webster​.com​/dictionary​/term

Encarta Dictionary:

term | terms [plural] | termed [past tense] | terming [present participle]

First use: 13th century

Origin: French terme "limit of time or space" from Latin terminus "end, boundary, limit"

encarta​.msn​.com​/dictionary 1861719147​/definition​.html  [offline]

Audio references

Wiktionary:

term | terms [plural] | termed [past tense] | terming [present participle]

Audio: North American English pronunciation of "term"

en​.wiktionary​.org​/wiki​/term

Collins Dictionary:

term

Audio: North American English pronunciation of "term"

www​.collinsdictionary​.com​/dictionary​/english​/term

Macmillan British Dictionary:

term | terms [plural]

Audio: British English pronunciation of "term"

www​.macmillandictionary​.com​/dictionary​/british​/term

term [transitive, often passive, verb] | termed [past tense] | terming [present participle] | terms [3rd-person singular present]

Audio: British English pronunciation of "term"

www​.macmillandictionary​.com​/dictionary​/british​/term 49

Macmillan American Dictionary:

term | terms [plural]

Audio: North American pronunciation of "term"

www​.macmillandictionary​.com​/dictionary​/american​/term

term [transitive, often passive, verb] | termed [past tense] | terming [present participle] | terms [3rd-person singular present]

Audio: North American pronunciation of "term"

www​.macmillandictionary​.com​/dictionary​/american​/term 48

Cambridge Dictionary:

term [entry 1]

Audio 1: British English pronunuciation of "term"

Audio 2: North American English pronunuciation of "term"

dictionary​.cambridge​.org​/dictionary​/british​/term 1

term [entry 3]

Audio 1: British English pronunuciation of "term"

Audio 2: North American English pronunuciation of "term"

dictionary​.cambridge​.org​/dictionary​/british​/term 3

the Free Dictionary:

term

Audio 1: North American English pronunciation of "term"

Audio 2: British English pronunciation of "term"

Audio 3: North American English pronunciation of "term" by speech synthesizer

www​.thefreedictionary​.com​/term

Google Dictionary:

term | terms [plural] | termed [past tense] | terming [present participle]

Audio: English pronunciation of "term"

www​.google​.com​/#hl=en&tbs=dfn​:1&fp=1&q=term

Merriam-Webster Pronunciation:

term

Audio: North American pronunciation of "term"

www​.merriam-webster​.com​/audio​.php file=term​0001 word=term

YourDictionary Audio:

term

Audio: North American English pronunciation of "term" by speech synthesizer

www​.yourdictionary​.com​/term

freedictionary.org:

Term

Audio: North American English pronunciation of "Term" by speech synthesizer

freedictionary​.org​/ Query=term

Page last updated: 2013-06-26

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